Working for Someone With a Different Political View

by Jolene Rheault February 19, 2018

This week has been rough. Following the school shooting in Florida, the nation has practically divided itself. What do you do if you are passionate about your beliefs while the person you work for is also outspoken about theirs…and they are the opposite of yours? Let’s take a look at some suggestions. I promise this won’t be a political agenda post and is beneficial regardless of your political affiliation!

  1. Decide whether the argument is worth it. Will it create an instant change? Is this someone in a position of power that can do something? If the answer is no, perhaps make a mental note to contact your state senators and representatives when work is done. Those are the people who CAN make a change. You can look up the information you need here: https://www.senate.gov/reference/reference_index_subjects/Directories_vrd.htm
  2. How will you feel after the confrontation? Odds are good that you’ll feel pretty negative which can have a snowball effect on the rest of your day. Have you ever gotten into it with a colleague and then came home, only to snap at your husband, argue over dinner, and just end up in an overall funk? Seriously, who needs that?! Sometimes it is better (though harder) to take a deep breath and count to 10.
  3. How will it affect your job? Consider that this article is targeted at employees whose employer holds the power to fire them in the palm of their hand. If the argument is over something that you feel is worth losing your job for, by all means, have at it. I’m not here to dictate someone’s actions, just offering some alternatives… If your discussion over the mayor’s new haircut is getting heated, take a note from Elsa and let it go.
  4. Some suggestions for walking away from a heated argument:
  • Excuse yourself to take a break. Take a walk and get some fresh air, it usually helps to clear your head.
  • Eat a piece of chocolate. I know, it sounds bizarre. But chocolate can actually have a euphoric effect on us. Over at Amano, they explain that eating chocolate releases several neurotransmitters that have positive effects on human feelings (that is, they make people happy). One chemical that causes the release of serotonin into the brain is tryptophan, found in (wait for it!) chocolate.
  • Drink some water. At mindful living network, James Hixon tells us that even mild dehydration can cause your moods to change. Drinking water also has a significant impact on alleviating depression and helping with sleep disorders. It helps with concentration and literally, makes your body “feel better.”

Do you have other suggestions? I’d love to hear them in the comments. I hope you have a happy, and peaceful, Monday!

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